Season Reviews, TV

STAR TREK: DISCOVERY (Season 1, Part 2): Reflections on the Journey

Star Trek: Discovery has enjoyed a fascinating first season, both in the context of its place in the television landscape and the historic Trek franchise as a whole.

For a start, it was a season of two halves, both shaped by different creatives with different aesthetics. Bryan Fuller’s original influence you can feel in the opening arc regarding the revered Klingon extremist T’Kuvma and how his death makes him a religious martyr, triggers civil infighting and launches a ‘crusade’ against the Federation who killed him. The parallels to modern religious fundamentalist terrorism are as potent an allegory as we’ve ever seen in Star Trek, with old series hand Fuller aware for any new show to work (especially one designed to relaunch the franchise on television), it would need to hold true to the precepts of what people loved about Star Trek: the fact it always reflected where we are as a modern 20th or 21st century society.

Those reflections became even more pointed following the mid-season break, as the combined stamp of Alex Kurtzman & Akiva Goldsman, plus key writers Gretchen Berg & Aaron Harbarts moved further into focus. The reflection became literal as the Discovery and her crew were thrown into the legendary Mirror Universe, a dark, inverse reflection of the Federation and humanity’s ‘future history’ first seen on The Original Series, and later continued on Deep Space Nine and Enterprise. For the most extended spell in the MU the franchise has ever given us, we are placed between the Terran Empire seen in ENT’s ‘In a Mirror, Darkly’ and TOS’ ‘Mirror, Mirror’, and the writers give themselves the freedom to explore this universe in much greater detail and tie together the majority of story and character arcs rumbling across the season, in the context of visiting this alternate universe.

What telling an extended story in the Mirror Universe affords the writers is the opportunity to make a pointed commentary and comparison with current global politics and social change. Many fans and commentators have made the point that given our current path as a species, our future is more likely to be the despotic, warlike, totalitarian Empire than the progressive, peaceful Federation – it’s not exactly a subtle point of analysis. What in TOS was a pulpy science-fiction concept designed to allow the main cast to play villainous versions of themselves, has now become far more of a genuine point of dramatic allegory.

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